Dachshund

Dachshund

Weight
20-30 Lbs
Height
8-10 Inches
Lifespan
12-15 Years
Exercise
1 Hour Per Day

Overview

Weight
20-30 Lbs
Height
8-10 Inches
Lifespan
12-15 Years
Exercise
1 Hour Per Day

Known the world over for its unique shape, the dachshund is an energetic, curious, and loyal companion. These dogs were originally bred to hunt burrowing prey in Germany. These instincts remain strong, and they love to explore, under the proper supervision of their loving owners. Currently, the AKC lists them as the 12th most popular dog breed in the United States. Both miniature and standard sizes enjoy popularity all over the world.

Though they have an independent streak, dachshunds are extremely loyal and attached to their family members. Their loyalty may cause some issues. Dachshunds can be overly protective of their packs. Even though they do well with children, they may not get along with children outside of their families. Consequently, dachshunds can become very attached to one person in their lives. If you do not curb this behavior through training, it may lead to worse separation anxiety. Depending on socialization and temperament, they may be shy of strangers or they may bark. Some suggest long-haired and miniature dachshunds are shyer than other size and coat varieties.

The Dachshund A High-Energy Dog

Dachshunds have high energy levels. Therefore, they will need plenty of daily exercise, half an hour to an hour daily. No dog likes being left alone for long periods of time, and dachshunds are no exception. If you personally cannot stay with your dog throughout the day, you may want to discuss sharing the load with someone else. Additionally, without proper mental stimulation, a dachshund can easily become bored and destructive. Games of hide and seek play into a dachshund’s hunting abilities. In addition, dachshunds have also succeeded at and enjoyed agility training.

This breed has been well-loved for centuries for a reason. If you think a dachshund would fit well into your lifestyle, look for a reputable breeder or rescue organization. Your dachshund is waiting for you!

History

As a breed, dachshunds can be traced back to 15th century Germany. What we recognize as the breed standard, however, was perfected and modified around the 17th century.

The most widely accepted theory of how dachshunds came to be is through intentionally breeding dwarf versions of taller German hunting dogs. Over time, this breeding to achieve selective dwarfism shortened their legs and lengthened their bodies. These adjustments made them ideal for hunting burrowing animals.

Dachshund directly translates from German to “badger dog” in English. Badgers were the primary prey of these uniquely suited hunting dogs. Their long bodies and uniquely shaped paws made them ideal for digging tunnels. Their strong forelimbs and front bodies made fighting 26 plus pound badgers easier. Their loud barks helped them signal their owners from underground. Packs of dachshunds sometimes helped their human owners hunt wild boar as well.

Though the United States only recognizes two sizes of dachshund, standard and miniature, Germany has a middle size of the breed. As time went on, Germany developed miniature dachshunds to hunt foxes and hares. In addition, German breeders developed a variety of coats so each dachshund could work in a different environment or climate. Currently, dachshunds are born with the standard short coat, a wire-haired coat, or a long-haired coat.

Dachshunds became popular in the United Kingdom during the Victorian era. The breed first made it to American shores in 1885. It was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) the same year. The breed became especially popular in America during the 1930s and 40s, despite the anti-German sentiments present during World War 2.

Today, dachshunds are the 12th most popular breed on the American Kennel Club’s list of 197 recognized breeds.

Health

Due to their unique body shapes and generations of selective breeding, dachshunds are prone to several health issues.

About a quarter of all dachshunds will experience back problems during their lifetimes. This is partially the result of their disproportional dwarfism, also called chondrodysplasia. It’s what makes their bodies low to the ground and long at the same time. Dachshunds may experience issues with brittle vertebral disks and their spinal cords. Regular exercise will help them strengthen their muscles. Carry them in a way which does not put stress on their spines. Discourage your dachshund from jumping down from high places.

Due to their smaller mouths and jaws, dachshunds tend to have crowded teeth. This usually causes dental issues like bad teeth and bad breath. Brush their teeth every day if you can with a specially made toothbrush and dog toothpaste. If they don’t let you, you may need to get your dachshund to the vet for regular tooth cleanings under anesthesia.

Dachshunds are badly affected by obesity, and they are one of the breeds most likely to become overweight. Extra fat may make joint, heart, and spinal issues much worse. Make sure to balance your dog’s caloric intake with their age and activity level. Regular exercise is very important for this energetic breed.

Dachshunds have a predisposition towards Cushing’s Disease. This is a condition where the adrenal gland produces too much of a hormone called cortisone. The symptoms develop slowly and are often confused with the normal aging process. Cushing’s Disease is easily treatable through medication. Make sure to contact your veterinarian if you see any symptoms.

Later in life, a dachshund may develop eye issues and is more prone than other breeds to several kinds of cancer.

Make sure not to skip your regular vet visits, vaccinations, and heartworm prevention. Knowing what health conditions dachshunds may develop will help you pay attention to symptoms and get treatment earlier.

Interesting Facts

  • Due to Anti-German sentiments during both World Wars, dachshunds were given different names in America during these periods. In WWI, they were called Liberty Hounds. During WWII, the name changed to the direct English translation of their names, badger dogs.
  • Archaeologists in Egypt have found pictures of short-legged long-bodied hunting dogs like dachshunds on walls. More recently, they found burial urns with mummified dachshund-like dogs inside.
  • Queen Victoria of England owned dachshunds and loved them. Her husband, Prince Albert, who was of German origin, introduced her to the breed. Her love of them brought them into popularity in the United Kingdom.
  • The dachshund was the mascot for the 1972 Olympics in Munich. Graphic designer Otl Aicher created Waldi, a colorful dachshund, as a logo.
  • Popular names for the dachshund include wiener dog and sausage dog due to their unique body shape.

Photos of Dachshund

Here are some Bernese mountain dog photos for you to get a good picture of the breed.
NAMES BY BREED

Dachshund Names

Female, Male, Inspired by size or by coat color

Emma

Greta

Lola

Martha

Carlo

Finn

Mason

Owen

Feather

Teddy

Checkers

Domino

Patches

Pepper

More About The Dachshund

Healthy Dachshund Diet: 5 Tips For The Perfect Diet

Healthy Dachshund Diet: 5 Tips For The Perfect Diet

Finding the best, healthiest food for any dog can be a challenge. For a breed prone to food allergies and other health issues, like a dachshund, the choice can be even harder. We have compiled a list of five tips to help you find a healthy dachshund diet for your dog. Finding The Best Dachshund Food In general, you will want to look for a food made somewhere with high…
5 Interesting Dachshund Facts

5 Interesting Dachshund Facts

You may recognize a dachshund’s unique shape and feisty personality. However, do you know about the unique and long history of this breed? Get to know your favorite breed better with our list of five interesting dachshund facts! Their natural instincts make dachshunds energetic and curious explorers. It’s their loyal and fun personalities which have made them a popular standard breed for centuries. Currently, they are the 12th most popular…
Dachshund Health: 5 Ways To Improve Your Dog’s Life

Dachshund Health: 5 Ways To Improve Your Dog’s Life

Like all breeds, dachshunds have genetic tendencies towards certain health issues. Their unique shape, formed through centuries of selective breeding, causes unique problems for them. Luckily, we have a list of five dachshund health tips to help you keep your dog happy. Focusing On Your Dachshund’s Health Don’t skip your dachshund’s regular vet visits or vaccinations. You should be updating your vet with any changes in your dog’s health and…