Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier

Weight
7-8 Lbs
Height
7-8 Inches
Lifespan
13-16 Years
Exercise
30-60 Minutes Per Day

Overview

Weight
7-8 Lbs
Height
7-8 Inches
Lifespan
13-16 Years
Exercise
30-60 Minutes Per Day

The Yorkshire Terrier is a tenacious guard dog in a tiny package. Though they are sometimes wary around strangers, they are loyal and affectionate towards their owners and families. Their small size makes them a great choice for living in apartments and smaller homes.

Like most dogs, Yorkies will need about half an hour of exercise a day. Take them for a daily walk, or play into their hunting instincts with fun games of hide and seek.

Yorkshire terriers make a fantastic choice for owners who are allergic to dogs. Since they have silky hair instead of fur, they do not shed as much or produce as much dander as other breeds. Though this silky hair requires plenty of grooming, a professional dog groomer will be able to show you manageable and stylish haircuts for them. They require daily brushing, with a special focus on mats, and baths once a month.

This is a breed which does best around older children, not younger children. Yorkshire terriers have difficulty getting along with much bigger dogs. However, with proper socialization, they get along well with cats and dogs of a similar size to them. Do not keep them with rodent pets, like rats, mice, or rabbits.

Yorkshire Terrier – A Dog Full Of Personality

Yorkshire terriers can often be stubborn during training. They don’t have the best reputation when it comes to housebreaking or commands. This breed requires patience and respect-building during training sessions. Get on their level while you train them. You can either elevate them to eye level with you, or come down to be just above eye level with them. This will make you less intimidating.

If you are interested in a Yorkshire terrier, make sure to do your research and find a trustworthy breeder or rescue organization. This beautiful little dog has won many hearts, and a Yorkshire terrier might win yours too!

History

The Yorkshire terrier, though it is a relatively recent breed, has cemented its popular stature around the world.

The breed originally came from Scotland, and was originally called the broken-haired Scotch terrier. As weavers moved into the North of England for work in the 19th century, they brought their little companion dogs with them. From there, breeders in Yorkshire and Lancashire further developed the breed into the standard we recognize today. A man named Angus Sutherland suggested the name change to Yorkshire terrier, and the name was officially adopted in the 1870s.

The current Yorkshire terrier was a cross-breed of a few different terrier breeds. Some included in the genome are now extinct or incorporated into other breeds, like the Clydesdale and paisley terriers. Others, like the Skye and Dandie Dinmont, still exist. One dog, Huddersfield Ben (1865-1871), is the Yorkshire terrier who typified and codified the breed standard. Since he was the father of so many litters, he’s often called the “foundation sire” of the Yorkshire terrier.

Like most terriers, Yorkshire terriers were primarily bred to hunt and catch small rodents. Workers and managers took them into Northern English mines and textile mills for pest control. Hunters also took them in their pockets to flush out and kill burrowing animals like hares, foxes, and badgers. Because of these strong instincts, Yorkshire terriers should never be kept with rodent pets. Even today, they might cause trouble.

Though they had working origins, Yorkshire terriers came to the attention of middle-class and upper-class dog lovers in the Victorian era. They fit in perfectly with that era’s trend of small dog breeds. In addition, their silky, unique coats brought an elegance which fit well into upper-class society.

The Yorkshire terrier was first brought to American shores in the 1870s. They became just as popular in the United States as they had been across the pond. They were one of the first breeds officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1885. Today, they are the 10th most popular breed on the AKC’s list of 197 recognized breeds.

Health

Yorkshire terriers are genetically prone to a few health issues, ranging from treatable to serious.

During their puppy years, a Yorkie may develop periods of extremely low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia also affects Yorkies during pregnancy. A Yorkshire terrier with hypoglycemia may become lethargic, confused, depressed, or faint. Long-term treatment will require veterinary diagnosis and dietary changes. As a short-term solution, you can rub honey or simple syrup over your Yorkshire terrier’s gums. Feed them high-protein meals or treats every few hours to help boost their energy.

Yorkshire terriers are also prone to allergies. Allergic triggers usually cause skin issues, which may cause a Yorkie to itch and scratch constantly. These skin issues may also result in hair loss. It’s extremely important to keep your Yorkie away from their allergy triggers, especially if they are allergic to wasp and bee stings. Make sure to treat symptoms immediately. You don’t want your Yorkshire terrier to go into anaphylactic shock.

Many toy breeds are genetically at risk for collapsed tracheas. Yorkshire terriers are one of these breeds. Check to see if your Yorkie breathes oddly, gags, or chokes frequently. A collar puts more strain on the trachea, so use a harness for your Yorkshire terrier instead. Try your best to keep them away from perfumes or smoke. Once diagnosed, your veterinarian will recommend either medication or surgery for treatment.

Yorkshire terriers are prone to a few degenerative eye diseases. These may just cause a few blind spots, or partial to full blindness. Unfortunately, these eye issues are not treatable. If your dog is blind, make sure to keep their water and food bowls in the same place in your home. Take the same route to walk every day.

A Yorkie may develop a specific liver shunt, obstructing blood flow to the liver. This is a serious condition which needs veterinary care, and may require surgical intervention.

Don’t miss your Yorkshire terrier’s regular vet visits, vaccines, and heartworm medications. Brush their teeth regularly. Keep a close eye on them for symptoms or anything out of the ordinary.

Interesting Facts

  • A Yorkshire terrier named Smoky, later promoted to Corporal, is considered to be a World War 2 hero. She was a companion to wounded soldiers and helped the United States Air Force build an airbase in Luzon, a city in the Philippines.
  • Even though they have terrier as part of their name, Yorkies are classified in the toy group, not in the terrier group, because of their smaller size.
  • Though the dog Toto was played by a cairn terrier in the film version of The Wizard of Oz, the book illustrations arguably depict him as a Yorkshire terrier. The original illustrator, W.W. Denslow, had a Yorkshire terrier as a pet.
  • Several Yorkies, including Thumbelina, Big Boss, and Sylvia, have held the Guinness World Record for smallest living dog.
  • Audrey Hepburn had a Yorkshire terrier named Mr. Famous. She’s credited with bringing the Yorkshire terrier back into popularity. Mr. Famous even made an appearance in her film, Funny Face.

Photos of Yorkshire Terrier

Here are some Bernese mountain dog photos for you to get a good picture of the breed.
NAMES BY BREED

Yorkshire Terrier Names

Female, Male, Inspired by size or by coat color

Anastasia

Duchess

Georgia

Princess

Dickens

Grayson

Mason

Prince

Biscuit

Pebbles

Dogzilla

Kong

Saber

Attila

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