Rachel
Rachel is a stay-at-home pet mom, caring for her dog, cat, turtle, tortoise, and fish. She's a content writer in various niches but most notably in the pet field, educating pet parents on the health and wellbeing of their furry friends. When she's not writing, she's reading, playing video games, or organizing something.
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Flying with Your Dog to Brazil – What You Need to Know

Rachel Poli Author
Rachel
May 5 ·
flying with your dog to Brazil

Maybe you’re going on vacation, or you’re moving to Brazil. Or perhaps you’re going there for work. Either way, if you’re in the country for a while, it’s good to bring your furry friend. So here’s everything you need about flying with your dog to Brazil. 

First, Discuss Travel Plans With Your Dog’s Veterinarian

No matter why you want to bring your dog to Brazil, you’ll want to check with your vet first. Before you make any flight plans, you’ll want to ensure that your dog is physically and mentally prepared for flight.

Also, there are many different requirements you’ll need to meet to get your dog on board the plane and into Brazil. But, again, your vet will be able to help you meet those requirements.

However, believe it or not, Brazil doesn’t require as much as some other countries to bring your pet in.

Either way, before you make any plans, talk to your vet to ensure that it’s a good option for you and your furry friend.

Your vet can give them a good check-up to ensure they’re as healthy as they can be and can give them any shots or boosters they may need. In addition, they can help you get all the documents you’ll need to bring your dog with you.

In addition, you can talk about your dog’s needs with your vet. For example, if your pup is prone to separation anxiety, you might decide to leave your dog behind with a trusted professional dog sitter or a family member.

On the other hand, if your dog has to go with you (maybe you’re moving or you’ll be in Brazil for a few months), your vet can discuss how best to prepare your dog for flight.

Finally, your vet can tell you the best ways to care for your dog before, during, and after the flight. 

Requirements To Get Your Dog Into Brazil

As mentioned earlier, Brazil doesn’t have as many requirements to get your dog in as some other places do.

For example, most places require your dog to be microchipped to get into the area. They’re specific about the type of microchip too.

On the other hand, Brazil doesn’t require your dog to be microchipped. So suppose they are microchipped, great. It’s better to be safe than sorry. However, if your pup isn’t microchipped, you won’t need to worry about getting one before heading to Brazil. 

At the very least, your dog should have an ID tag on its collar. Of course, this isn’t required, but if your pup gets lost in Brazil, you’ll have an easier time tracking them down.

However, your dog will need to have a valid health certificate. This certificate is only valid for 60 days, so you’ll need to get it authorized and bring your dog to Brazil within sixty days or about two months. 

For the health certificate to be valid, it needs to be signed by a USDA Accredited Veterinarian.

In addition, your furry friend will need to get at the rabies vaccination at least 21 days before entering Brazil, but no later than 12 months before. If your pup has the three-year rabies vaccination, they may be accepted. 

If you’re bringing a puppy less than three months old, they do not require the rabies vaccine. However, the puppy may not be granted access if they come from a high-risk area for rabies. 

Also, within 15 days of entering Brazil, your dog needs to be treated for internal and external parasites. 

You can see everything you’ll need to bring your pup to Brazil in their requirements on the Brazilian government website.

How Your Dog Will Fly On The Airplane

When flying to Brazil, your dog can travel in a few different ways. For example, they can go in the cabin with you or in the cargo hold.

According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), your pet might be more comfortable in the cargo hold. It’s dim and quiet, so if your pup has anxiety, it might be more soothing for them to be in there.

However, the airlines do not take responsibility for the care and wellbeing of your pet before, during, and after the flight. So, you’ll need to fly with your dog at your own risk.

You’ll be able to keep a better eye on your dog if they’re in the cabin with you. However, it’s good to talk about it with your vet first. For example, the cargo hold might be more soothing for them, but if they have separation anxiety from you, it could further stress them.

Also, it’ll depend on how big your dog is. For example, small dogs can sit in the cabin with you. On the other hand, medium or large dog breeds will have to go into the cargo hold because they won’t be able to fit in the cabin with you.

Either way, you’ll need to tell the airline that you’ll bring a pet when you book your flight. If the crate and the animal are small enough to fit under your seat in the cabin, then the dog can be with you. Otherwise, they’ll have to go into the cargo hold.

Banned Dog Breeds In Brazil

Luckily, Brazil doesn’t ban any dog breeds. So, no matter what dog breed you have as a pet, you’re free to bring them to Brazil as long as they meet all the other requirements. 

Your Dog’s Comfort Comes First

Flying on an airplane is scary for most humans, let alone dogs who don’t understand what a plane is, how it works, or where they’re going.

For instance, they may feel safer and more comfortable in the cargo hold, but if your dog has separation anxiety or is afraid to try new things, the dark cargo hold (and being away from you) may stress them further.

You’ll want to work with your vet to ensure that your dog is fully prepared. 

So, here are some tips to ensure that your dog is prepared to fly:

  • Purchase plane tickets that have as few layovers and connections as possible
  • Choose arrival times to avoid extreme heat or cold
  • Train your dog to get used to their carrier
  • Discuss any anxiety needs with your vet beforehand
  • If your dog goes into the cabin, check-in as late as possible
  • If your dog goes into the cargo hold, check-in as early as possible
  • Walk your dog before your flight and immediately after arrival
  • Avoid food and drink a few hours before the flight

These tips will help reduce stress for your dog, and they’ll also keep them as healthy as possible.

Overall, you want to keep the flight as safe and positive as possible for your pup. First, however, you need to keep up with the country and state you’re entering and the airline’s requirements.

Should You Fly With Your Dog to Brazil?

If your dog is healthy enough and meets all the requirements, it’ll be a fun trip. Brazil doesn’t require as much as some other places, so it’ll be easy to bring your furry friend along. 

Rachel Poli Author
WRITTEN BY
Rachel
Rachel is a stay-at-home pet mom, caring for her dog, cat, turtle, tortoise, and fish. She's a content writer in various niches but most notably in the pet field, educating pet parents on the health and wellbeing of their furry friends. When she's not writing, she's reading, playing video games, or organizing something.
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