Rachel
Rachel is a stay-at-home pet mom, caring for her dog, cat, turtle, tortoise, and fish. She's a content writer in various niches but most notably in the pet field, educating pet parents on the health and wellbeing of their furry friends. When she's not writing, she's reading, playing video games, or organizing something.
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Exercises

Jogging With Your Dog – Dos And Don’ts

Rachel Poli Author
Rachel
May 3 ·
jogging with your dog

If you lead an active lifestyle and enjoy hiking or jogging, you might want a buddy to go with you. Dogs can be great running companions, but not every doggo is suitable. So, let’s talk about jogging with your dog and some dos and don’ts that go along with it.

How To Choose A Jogging Partner In A Dog

If you want to bring your dog along on your jogs, keep a few things in mind. For example, think about the following:

  • Your dog’s breed
  • Your dog’s size
  • The dog’s age
  • The dog’s personality and temperament

Some dogs are too young to be going on jogs, especially for long periods. On the other hand, depending on your dog’s size, they’ll have short legs and might not be able to keep up with you. They also won’t be able to last too long on a jog, either.

Then, you need to look at your dog’s breed, temperament, and personality. All dogs need regular exercise, but some need more than others.

For instance, breeds that need a good hour or two of exercise per day will be a great candidate for jogging with you. However, depending on their temperament and personality, they may love it or prefer to be couch potatoes.

Dos For Jogging With Your Dog

First, let’s go over some of the things you can do if you want to jog with your dog.

Bring Them To The Vet

Before you do anything, talk to your vet about it. They can give your doggo an excellent check-up to ensure they’re healthy and fit enough to go jogging with you.

Also, the vet will be able to help you prepare for jogging with your dog. For example, they can give you tips and tricks for keeping yourself and your pup safe during your runs.

Start Slow

If you’ve never jogged with your dog before, start slow. For example, you should be in a good walking routine with your dog before going for runs.

Once your dog is used to walking a certain distance every day, you can slowly start jogging. For instance, walk about one-third of the way, jog for another third of your route, and then walk again for the rest of the course.

If you’re jogging and you notice your dog slowing down or panting a lot, then stop jogging and continue to walk. Gauge how your dog does on the jogs to see how long and far they can last while jogging or if they should stick to walking.

Take Frequent Water Breaks

Even if your dog is in a good jogging routine and can run all the way, you still want to stop for a break. You can slow down your jogging every 15 minutes to give yourself and your pup a water break.

It will keep your dog hydrated, but it’s a good idea to take a quick break so your dog isn’t sprinting for the entire run.

Properly Leash Train Your Dog

Finally, one thing you want to do is make sure your dog is appropriately leash trained and knows basic commands.

When jogging with your dog, they shouldn’t be running ahead of you or distracted by other people, dogs, and squirrels. They shouldn’t pull on the lead. If you need to stop at a crosswalk or to take a break, you should be able to say a simple command, and your dog should listen right away.

Don’ts For Jogging With Your Dog

Jogging is a fun activity with your dog, but it’s not suitable for every pup. So, you’ll want to make sure it’s safe for your pup. So, here’s what not to do.

Don’t Skip A Warm Up

You should never skip your warm-up no matter how often your dog runs with you or how used they are to it. This means walking first, then jogging, and then walking again.

Warming up allows your dog to get used to the pace and warm up their body and joints before breaking into a jog. Also, it will enable them to get into a rhythmic breathing pattern.

Don’t Run When It’s Too Hot

Always keep an eye on the weather and the temperature, especially if your dog has a longer coat. Days are usually the warmest around noon, so you’ll want to go for a job either early or in the evening.

If it’s too hot outside and you go in the middle of the day, your dog might overheat. They could get heatstroke or get dehydrated, especially if you don’t take frequent water breaks.

Finally, the hot pavement could hurt the pads on their paws.

Don’t Feed Your Dog Beforehand

Don’t go for a jog shortly after your dog eats a meal. Also, avoid giving them treats on their run. Depending on how long your jog lasts and how fast you go, your dog might get sick and run on a full stomach.

Jogging With Your Dog Is A Great Activity

Jogging together will keep you and your doggo fit and healthy. First, however, you’ll need to make sure your dog can handle it and that they enjoy the jog.

Rachel Poli Author
WRITTEN BY
Rachel
Rachel is a stay-at-home pet mom, caring for her dog, cat, turtle, tortoise, and fish. She's a content writer in various niches but most notably in the pet field, educating pet parents on the health and wellbeing of their furry friends. When she's not writing, she's reading, playing video games, or organizing something.
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