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Labradoodle Puppies

Author Happy Doggo
News Hound
Nov 8 ·

A Labradoodle is the hybrid of a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle. They were first crossbred in Australia with the intent to create a hypoallergenic service dog. They’ve absolutely skyrocketed in popularity over the last few years. You may be wondering whether a Labradoodle would be right for you and your family. Luckily, we’ve compiled an extensive guide to Labradoodle Puppies to help you decide.

Where To Get Labradoodle Puppies

Because of their huge current popularity, Labradoodles are very likely to show up in backyard breeding operations and puppy mills. While you might want to rescue a puppy or dog from this sort of situation, the truth is your money should really go towards someone who cares about the well-being of their dogs and the health of the Labradoodle breed. If a breeder refuses to let you see where they’re keeping their dogs, stay far away. Remember, if the cost of a puppy seems too good to be true, it means it probably is.

While the American Kennel Club doesn’t recognize the Labradoodle, there are organizations like it which are devoted to certifying responsible breeders of hybrid “designer” pups. These include the American Canine Hybrid Club, the International Designer Breed Registry, and the Designer Dog Kennel Club. A certification from any one of these organizations is a good sign you’ve found a responsible Labradoodle breeder. In Australia, some organizations are working towards codifying a breed standard for the Labradoodle and other Poodle mixes. Hopefully, this will mean more consistency in breeding standards for these pups around the world. Myguyrambo…

Unlike other hybrid breeds, there are breed-specific rescues for Doodle mixes. They may also show up in breed-specific rescues for Labradors and for Poodles. You can also check your local animal shelter for a Labradoodle. If you’re not sure you want a puppy, rescuing or fostering a Labradoodle may be a great choice for you! While rescuing gives a dog a second chance at a better life, there are a couple of downsides. For one, you’re less likely to find a puppy at a rescue or shelter. Second, it’s less likely the rescue or shelter has complete health or breeding information for a specific dog.

Whether you go the breeder route or the rescue route, make sure you do your research before choosing your Labradoodle.

The Cost

Since Labradoodles are very popular right now, they tend to cost quite a bit. A reputable breeder will usually charge about $1500 to $2000 for a Labradoodle puppy. As with any puppy, a higher cost is usually a good sign you’ve found someone responsible. An ethical breeder will usually incorporate important care and housing costs into the cost of a puppy. These costs can also include important health screenings. A higher up-front cost for a puppy will usually mean your dog will be healthy throughout their life.

Appearance

Labradoodles are highly variable in both coat color and texture. Most have loose curls or waves. Their colors include apricot, caramel, gold, chalky-white, black, red, chocolate, parchment, blue, cafe, cream, and silver. Their coats can also be multi-colored.

Labradoodles can also vary widely in size, depending on the size of their Poodle parent. Their height averages out to 22-25 inches tall at the shoulder. Most weigh between 50 and 75 pounds. Ollie…

Temperament

Even after multiple generations of breeding, Labradoodles can vary in temperament. However, most get along with basically everyone, including other dogs, strangers, seniors, and even smaller pets. While they are great with kids, early training is important. Labradoodles can be big, and have a lot of exuberant energy. The main risk between Labradoodles and kids is accidental injury from a dog jumping on or knocking over your child. The hybrid is normally affectionate and devoted to their families, like both of their parent breeds.

A Labradoodle will have a high amount of playful energy, but does okay with a moderate amount of exercise. It’s great to give them a daily walk and full reign of a fenced-in yard. Taking them to off-leash dog parks is also a great option. Even though they’re not prone to separation anxiety, they’ll still love and need devoted family time. A Labradoodle will need regular stimulation, lest they become destructive. You can either stock up on interactive puzzle games and toys, or sign them up for canine sports like rally and agility trials. Labradoodlesslovakia…

Labradoodles are both intelligent and eager to please. This makes them highly trainable. Since they were first bred as service and therapy dogs, many over the years have done just that. It’s important to get their training and socialization started early, since Labradoodles can range widely in temperament.

Labradoodle Puppies – Veterinary Needs

A Labradoodle can inherit any number of health conditions from either of their parent breeds. These can include hip and elbow dysplasia, epilepsy, allergies, diabetes, progressive retinal atrophy, and hypothyroidism. A responsible Labradoodle breeder will perform health screenings in their breeding stock for these issues. However, it’s still a good idea to keep an eye out for symptoms, especially if your Labradoodle is a rescue. Regular vet visits should help with detection, diagnosis, and treatment. Contact your vet if you notice any changes in behavior or health. Zuko…

After bringing your Labradoodle puppy home, it’s important to schedule vet visits every three weeks until they’re about a few months old. These visits will help your vet get to know your new puppy, and make sure they’re growing up happy and healthy. In addition, this is where your vet will give an important series of puppy vaccinations. These include shots for rabies, distemper, and parvovirus. If you choose, you can also vaccinate your dog against Bordetella, or kennel cough. Read our puppy vaccine schedule to find out more.

Diet

Since Labradoodles are prone to some digestive and food-related issues, it’s best to take these into account before choosing a diet. You may want to perform an allergy test with your vet before choosing a food for them. Even without the allergy test, you can choose a food which excludes common allergens for dogs. These include soy, wheat, corn, and chicken. Home-cooking your dog’s food is a good way to ensure you can control the ingredients they eat.

In addition, if your Labradoodle develops diabetes mellitus, you’ll want to consult your veterinarian on a proper diet for them. Diabetes is a manageable condition in dogs, with proper dietary measures and proper dosing of insulin.

In any case, a food for a Labradoodle should have a good percentage of protein to support their energy levels. The protein should come from a recognizable meat or meat meal. A good amount of healthy fats will also support their brain function. The ingredients should be high-quality.

You’ll also want to take your dog’s age, size, weight, and overall health into account before choosing a food for them. Your vet or a certified pet nutritionist should be able to help you with this process. Cottoncreek…

Labradoodle Puppies

Grooming

Even though the Labradoodle was bred specifically for minimal shedding, there’s a lot of variation in shedding amounts between them. Some Labradoodles will take after their Poodle parents, not shedding much at all. Some will take after their Lab parents and shed all the time. Shedding amount will also depend on their fur texture. Whatever your Labradoodle’s hair texture, you’ll still want to check them regularly for mats on their bellies, under their tails, behind their ears, and in their armpits. You should brush a Labradoodle once or twice a week. You should also start scheduling their haircuts with a groomer once they’re old enough.

It’s very important to check your Labradoodle’s ears frequently. This is a breed that’s prone to ear infections because of their floppy, heavy ears. Unless you’re walking your Labradoodle regularly on hard surfaces, you should trim their nails once every two weeks or so. Brush their teeth regularly with a dog-specific toothbrush and toothpaste.

Labradoodle Puppies – Photos

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Labradoodle Puppies

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Labradoodle Puppies eyes

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Labradoodle Puppies cuteYou know know everything you need to know about Labradoodle puppies!

Author Happy Doggo
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News Hound
Obsessed with dogs and finding all the latest news and trends from around the world.
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