Rachel
Rachel is a stay-at-home pet mom, caring for her dog, cat, turtle, tortoise, and fish. She's a content writer in various niches but most notably in the pet field, educating pet parents on the health and wellbeing of their furry friends. When she's not writing, she's reading, playing video games, or organizing something.
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Stray Dogs In Australia – What You Should Do If You Find One

Rachel Poli Author
Rachel
Apr 19 ·
Stray Dogs In Australia

If you’ve ever lost your dog before, you know it feels like to search for them frantically. You can only hope that they’re safe and sound and will find their way back home at some point. So, let’s talk about stray dogs in Australia and what you should do if you find one.

Local Places To Bring The Stray Dog

Believe it or not, there are many stray dogs in Australia. Luckily, there are plenty of shelters and rescues that will take in stray dogs.

These places will keep the dogs safe until they can be reunited with their owners. Or they’ll help rehome the dog.

Some of these places you can bring stray dogs are as follows:

Stray Dogs In Australia – How Shelters Work

One of the great things about animal shelters in Australia is that they genuinely care for dogs and other animals.

Most shelters are no-kill, which means that the dogs can stay there indefinitely if they do not get adopted.

However, some other animals shelters will euthanize the dogs if needed. There’s no time period for this, though.

The dogs will only get euthanized if they become too old, too ill, or there’s no more room in the shelter for them.

Luckily, most dogs aren’t at the shelter for too long in Australia.

For example, if they have a microchip, the dog’s owner has about 16 days to come forward. When they do, the pup is free to go back home where they belong.

On the other hand, if the dog doesn’t have a microchip, its owners have about seven days to come forward.

Stray Dogs In Australia

After these dates, if their owner doesn’t claim the dog, the dog is the Australian council’s property.

The dog can be placed in a foster home or remain at the shelter when this happens. Then, they get put up for adoption.

The shelter will also deworm, desex, microchip, and update the dog on all of their vaccinations. Then, when the dog goes back home or gets adopted into a new family, the pup is all taken care of. 

Australian Laws About Stray Dogs

Similar to animal shelters, you need to follow laws if you find a stray dog. For instance, it’s your civic duty to keep the streets free of homeless animals.

Australian law says that if you see a stray dog, you need to do what you can to bring it to the animal shelter.

To do this, you can catch the dog yourself. However, be careful when doing it. If the dog is too scared or aggressive, you won’t want to go near them yourself.

If the dog lets you near them, you can bring them to the vet or an animal shelter. They can help the dog from there.

On the other hand, if the pup doesn’t want you to need them, you can call the local authorities. They can help and bring the dog somewhere safe.

If you find a stray dog and do not report it, you may get fined.

Stray Dogs In Australia

More General Advice

If you’re able to get near the dog, one of the first things you can do is check its collar for an ID tag. This will typically have the phone number of the dog’s owner. You can call them and meet you where you are to pick up their dog.

However, if they don’t have a collar, they may or may not have a home. If the pup is friendly enough and allows you to capture them, bring them to a local vet or shelter.

The vet will be able to scan the dog for a microchip. If they have one, they can locate the owner. On the other hand, if they don’t have a microchip, then the dog can safely go to the shelter.

Should that happen, then the shelter and yourself can take pictures of the dog and head to social media. Hopefully, after spreading the word a bit, the owners will see their pup at the shelter and return them home.

On the other hand, if you can’t get close enough to the dog to capture them, you can take pictures and post about the doggo on social media right away.

You don’t want to scare the dog further, and you certainly don’t want to hurt it if the dog happens to be aggressive.

Finally, call the local authorities or animal control. They can come by and pick up the dog safely and bring them to an animal shelter where the pup will be safe.

Stray Dogs In Australia

Always Help A Stray Dog If You Can

Dogs deserve to have a happy, healthy home just like we do. So, if you happen to see a dog wandering around on its own, do what you can to help them find its way back home. 

Rachel Poli Author
WRITTEN BY
Rachel
Rachel is a stay-at-home pet mom, caring for her dog, cat, turtle, tortoise, and fish. She's a content writer in various niches but most notably in the pet field, educating pet parents on the health and wellbeing of their furry friends. When she's not writing, she's reading, playing video games, or organizing something.
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